My Story: New Blog Feature!

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What is the Ivory Tower?

There will be more said about this later…. but the Ivory Tower is a well-known ‘thing’ in Higher Education (like in seminary!).  It’s a term that means ‘having to do with higher education’ and it symbolizes the lofty ideals of education and how gaining such knowledge has been, historically, not easy to do because knowledge wasn’t as easily accessible in the past.

But it signifies something different for me and Podcast Seminary.  “The Ivory Tower” is a phrase I’m using to explain how Podcast Seminary wants to help people with ‘discipleship’ and it symbolizes the lofty ideal of Christian education– namely, the biblical responsibility we have of making disciples and taking them into ever-higher levels of commitment, knowledge, freedom, and victorious living.

More about that later, but the Ivory Tower will be revealed soon, and it will show and explain how Podcast Seminary wants to help you grow spiritually, and will give you a step-by-step spiritual growth strategy for personal growth, to help you become all God has made you to become!  I can’t wait to share it.


OK, Now What Is “My Story?”

“My Story” is a new inspirational blog post I want to offer regularly here that tells you the inspirational story of interesting people who we’ve gotten to know and who are growing in their faith, and who are using Podcast Seminary resources to encourage their growth.  I plan to share stories like mine– and theirs– and YOURS here on this blog through regular “My Story” features like this.

Has Podcast Seminary helped you?  Contact Dean Freddy Cardoza and he will tell you how to share your story, and will give you the tools you need to get it ready to be shared here with others!


MY STORY… BEFORE

My story begins as a child in my first hometown of Huntsville, Tennessee. We lived in an old white farmhouse without running water right here where the trees now stand.  This photo is from this year.  Just take yourself back to the 1970s and that’s where it was– only gone now and grown up with trees and weeds where it used to stand.
Little Creek, Huntsville After mom remarried, we moved to a nearby town named Oneida, TN (take a look around– this image starts off not in the most beautiful part of town). We went irregularly to our original church, but not that often and I really had no understanding of faith or a relationship with God at the time.
Ultimately, I was invited to a leading church in town to hear famed football player, Reggie White, then still a college player at the University of Tennessee. He and player Willie Gault were speaking. That evening I heard the truth of the gospel, the message of God’s love, and invited Jesus into my life. For the first time, in the months to come, I started to put some of the pieces of life together.
In those days I had several people help me grow. Had it not been for people who took time and were transparent enough to encourage me to grow, I would have gone nowhere spiritually. This included people who made an indelible mark on my life, that stretched from the earliest days of my faith until college.
It all began with Judy Adkins Chitwood, who met with me and one of my best friends EVERY WEEK for two years on Saturdays, to help encourage my growth. Without Judy I’d be nowhere. Then came Paul Stith, my first youth minister. He ever so patiently helped answer the hundreds of questions I had about God and faith and life. From taking me on long road trips across the state to sharing about his family’s faith, I grew so much under his tutelage. Then came Scott Andrews, my second youth minister. He and wife Jennifer were treasures that unconditionally loved me and opened their home regularly to me and others, encouraging my growth—and remaining friends for years, even until now. Along with them came the late Pastor John Shepherd, a giant among men, who was simply “The Man,” and I’ll never exhaust my thanks for him. Them, plus very influential people like Rose West, Jack E. Lay, Allen Matthews, Dale Smith, and Tom McBroom—all of these were crucial in helping me grow spiritually. They helped disciple me. That’s what the Christian life is about! That’s the ‘point!’

My Story… Now

Today, due to the investment of those people and a few decisions of my own, I am what I am. I am approaching my 35th year as a believer—hard to believe—and I’ve sought to walk with God like I was taught in my youth and early adulthood after becoming a Christian. God’s given me enough insight and training that I want, and have a responsibility, to make disciples like those who helped me become one.

My Story…. In the Future

That’s where Podcast Seminary comes in. I understand that Podcast Seminary isn’t ‘really’ a seminary! But it’s sort of like a seminary, in that it’s meant to provide systematic and comprehensive training over a large area of discipleship content that most Christians don’t get. They don’t get it because not enough people are “making disciples.”
I believe that “being” a disciple is great—but that’s only half of it. We then have to go from “being” to “making” disciples (Matthew 28:19-20). So Podcast Seminary is a resource and set of tools I’m creating to help people grow in their faith and relationship with God.
I want to help people gain access to discipleship content that is broader and deeper, but also more condensed. I want to provide it in easy to access ways (like social media) and in more substantial ways people learn (like video, blogs, and audio). Using audio, I will create more substantial content through producing audio courses, which will be a big part of the type of teaching and training I want to provide. In time, as people discipline themselves to listen and learn to my discipleship-based podcast audio courses, they will begin to build strong, renewed minds that are comprehensively informed and systematically instructed in all the essential areas of the Christian life.
My vision is to help people become and make disciples all over the world, wherever they are, by providing these and other resources and by personally connecting to them through other things I have planned, so more people will have access to substantial, life-changing truths that I believe every Christian should be taught. That’s what discipleship and Podcast Seminary are all about.
That’s my story. And just like Judy, Paul, Scott, John, Rose, Jack, Allen, Dale, and Tom helped teach me, I hope you’ll let me be a part of teaching you to “observe everything (he) commanded” like the Great Commission commands me and us to do! Then, my prayer is that you’ll “teach others also” (2 Timothy 2:2).


Your Turn

Do you have a story? I want to hear about it. I am even willing to consider featuring your story on PodcastSeminary.com/blog in a future post like this one.
Your StoryConnect with me through leaving a comment below or by going to the Contact page, and we’ll get started!

What the Global South Needs to Know About Postmodernism

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What the Global South Needs to Know About Postmodernism

I was asked by a fellow believer and reader of my blog about the problem of Postmodernism. As of late, Postmodernism has begun making more headway in Africa, particularly Zambia, and further into the Global South. He invited me to respond with a blog, so I wanted to include it here. Following are a handful of my thoughts on Postmodernism. Later, I will be offering a 2 hour audio course from Podcast Seminary on this issue. For now, this is a brief response.


Christianity Always Has Tension with Culture and Society
Christianity has always had a degree of tension with society. This is because of the Apostle Paul’s injunction in Romans. There, in Romans 12:2, he charged believers who were surrounded by a culture generally hostile to the values of the Christian gospel not to be “conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect” (NASV).
Because of the reality that Christians live in an environment that is increasingly hostile to the gospel and to believers themselves, Christian educators must seek how to prepare believers to live in the world without being conformed by it. That critical task is made more difficult due to the onslaught of Postmodernism which is seeking to dominate the next several decades of Western thought—and that now threatens the Global South as well.
What is Postmodernism?

One might pose the questions, “What is postmodernism?” and “Why should a familiarity with it be considered important?” It has been said that “Postmodernism is a throw-away word that means everything and nothing” (Goetz, 1997). It is a word which did not secure a dictionary definition by the end of the Twentieth Century. Nevertheless, according to one of the foremost writers in postmodern thought, Jean-Francois Lyotard, postmodernism can be reduced to the simple common denominator of incredulity toward metanarratives (Knight, 1998).
Put plainly, Postmodernism (in its many forms and expressions) rejects the possibility of a cohesive worldview that explains reality. It is similar to the idea of Existentialism or, better, Nihilism, saying that life has no essential meaning, but then allows individuals to flagrantly choose their own truth, their own meaning, and their own values—as their individualized personal worldview.
The Essence of Postmodernism’s Ideological Bankruptcy

Obviously, such an approach inevitably leads to conflicts with nearly everyone else in the world about things such as meaning, truth, morality, ethics, and the nature of knowledge, language, truth, and destiny. ***Even so, Postmodern proponents wish to live in that state of constant moral and existential confusion, because the ambiguity of life, ethics, morality, and meaning promise what they seek: complete personal autonomy (Subjectivism) and the rejection of all authority except their own (Moral Relativism).***
Ah, but alas, the Bible teaches that there is nothing new under the sun (Eccl 1:9), as the Postmodern way of life is nothing more than a warmed over philosophy popular during the days of the Old Testament judges when “each man did what was right in his own eyes” (Jud 17:6). The ultimate result of Postmodernism is beginning to be seen in the West: the breakdown of personal ethics, rejection of law and order, resistance of justice, and personal ruin.
The Onslaught Against Christian Virtue by Postmodernism
Meanwhile, Christians continue to insist on the existence of truth, morality, and meaning—but are beginning to be targets of mild persecution for holding positions contrary to Postmodernism. In these last days, postmodern people in Western society “will not put up with sound teaching” (2 Tim 3).
But in their rebellion against God and their war against logic and sound reason, the unexpected result of Postmodernism in the United States seems to be a twofold outcome: First, believers and churches struggle to maintain their witness in the cultural decay and societal chaos that Postmodern has wrought. And second, people willingly deluded by Postmodernism’s false promise of freedom are now being victimized, scandalized, exploited, and destroyed by living out their valueless worldview.
The Disintegration of Culture, Society, and Possibly Civilization
The result is that civilization itself is being shaken here, as we watch others’ lives disintegrate before our very eyes.
Our word of warning to the Global South and believers there is simple: Avoid the error of European and American Postmodernism and learn to think for yourselves. You do not want to enter in to this pain and decay that is the only possible outcome of the Postmodern belief system. It is a bankrupt view of life that only makes promises of autonomy that it cannot fulfill, leading to even greater bondage and personal disrespect than one thought possible. I have seen this and plead with you to fight against Postmodernism in order to preserve your faith, culture, and dignity.

3 Steps to Make Men From Mice (Audio Podcast)

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God doesn’t want us to live in fear—but many do.
This session is to challenge us not to fear, but to overcome it with courage.
Throughout scripture, God says it again, and again, and again—Fear Not; Be Not Afraid, Be Strong and Courageous, and other similar phrases— a few hundred times, in fact. So it’s clear that God doesn’t want us to be afraid.
But how do we overcome debilitating fear? Important tips are presented here in this special episode.
Want even more? Check out my long-talk given at a men’s retreat for Saddleback Church in 2016. Check it out


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Is Jesus Really the Only Way? ("Can I Ask That?" Video Series)

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Can I Ask That? Series


Is Jesus Really the Only Way?

“Can I Ask That?” Video Series: Session 7 of 7

Is Jesus Really the Only Way?
As a Christian, I say “Yes” and for good reason. But the Bible makes it clear that not only “Christians” should believe in Jesus. Rather, God wants everyone to believe and follow Christ as Lord (boss). How can God make such an audacious ask? Well, for one thing– He’s God! But there’s more…
God makes claim on being the only way to eternal life because of a few logical facts: No other person in the history of humanity ever rose from the dead—except Jesus. What’s more, no other faith even has the audacity to teach such a thing— except Christianity. The Bible uses that central fact as the primary truth on which the entire Christian faith rises and falls.
Once Jesus rose from the dead, he stuck around the next 40 days to prove He had risen and defeated death, something documented to believers and skeptics alike. In doing so, this became the greatest attested miracle in history. The Resurrection of Jesus is the #1 Mic Drop of all time.
And through the Resurrection, Jesus demonstrated that He is all powerful, by personally overcoming death—after having lived the greatest moral life in history.


Listening Challenge: Learn More About How Christianity Contrasts with Other Faiths

LEARN ABOUT CHRISTIANITY


On the basis of who He was and is, Jesus claimed to be God in the flesh, the Son of God. He claimed that He was the one Way, the One Truth, and the One way to Eternal Life. Since Jesus lived a life of perfection that should be the model for all people—and because Jesus alone raised from the dead and since no one before or since has claimed or proven the same as Jesus, He has the sole right to make such an audacious claim.
But ironically, that’s not the major hurdle for people. Once they realize all this, you would think it would be impossible to object to Jesus being the One and Only Way. But that objection is just a smokescreen.
If God gave us 2 ways, instead of one way to God, people would remain unhappy. If God gave them 2 ways instead of 3, they’d be unhappy. Even if God said, you can have a million ways—we’d still want one more. You see, the problem with Jesus being the only way isn’t really Jesus. It’s that, as humans, we want COMPLETE AUTONOMY. We resist submitting because we want to be our own and only authority. But because Jesus lived a perfect life, unlike us, and died for our salvation, unlike us, and raised from the dead on His own power, unlike us or anyone else, Jesus is Lord of All, and insists that He and He only is the Only Way to God. It makes complete sense.



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Secret Sin: The Unspoken Danger of Living in a "Fishbowl" (Blog)

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Secret Sin: The Unspoken Danger of Living in a "Fishbowl"


Secret Sin: How to Understand and Avoid It

One of the most tricky and insidious forms of disobedience is Secret Sin. Secret sin “happens” because of all kinds of reasons, but they seem to be rooted in either raging against living in a fish bowl of maintaining a life of perfection OR the simple desire for living with unaccountable personal autonomy (to do whatever we want) without suffering the ramifications of our decisions.
Most of the time secret sin tempts us because we feel as if we’re living in a fishbowl– a life where we live with ‘glass houses’ and everybody knows our business and scrutinizes our lives to the nth degree. That can be too much to take, especially when we live for people’s approval instead of seeking the authenticity of living for the Lord and Him alone.
Let’s face it, certain types of behaviors are not tolerated in society– nor by conscience. So people learn to cover their tracks by being crafty. This leads to the issue of secret sin.
Secret Sin Can Contaminate Us in Part and as a Whole
Though sin cannot be completely contained—since it, in truth, corrupts our entire beings—at the same time, humans have the ability to partition our hearts. When we want to hide our sin from being exposed, we partition our lives—like a house, where certain interior rooms have no doors and complete access is given, but other rooms have locked doors where those rooms’ contents are hidden. Humans are like that—we sometimes lock certain areas of our hearts from God and others, and allow ourselves unfettered freedom in those areas—areas that Satan exploits by concentrating certain areas of our lives with targeted contamination.

Secret Sin Causes us to Compartmentalize Bad Behavior

Sin creates psychological disorder. It affects us at a very deep and profound level. It disfigures our souls. It corrupts our minds. But we have the ability to be or pretend to be good and upright in certain areas of our character. So certain parts of us seem upright, while allowing other areas of our character to be corrupted.
There are times that certain areas of our lives seem untouched by sin, and that it destroys other areas of our personality entirely. We’ve seen this all our lives. Think of the many news stories where someone is the greatest neighbor in the world— but is found out to be a sadist and sociopath.
Secret Sin Makes Integrity Impossible
There’s the sad story of serial killer John Wayne Gacy, a man who had dozens of bodies buried in the crawl space under his home. This same man has photos with him and the wife of President Jimmy Carter together. He was able to keep it together and seem like a pleasant person while “part” of his life was cordoned off, while the other part contained this monster.
He regressed into a wonderfully kind person who dressed up like a clown and, by all accounts, entertained children at birthday parties and, as far as we know, never harmed a child. But that same man was demonized toward young men. He victimized 33 people in all, while being known as a public do-gooder.
That’s an extreme example, but it’s a common thing for people to have areas of secret sin, where our lives are allowed to be out of control—areas that Satan uses to corrupt us.
So as people, we sin—and can become enslaved to sin. But the problem is that sin never does, nor can it, satisfy. Because only God can fill the deepest needs of human beings.
Sin Predictably Fails to Bring Lasting Satisfaction
At last, sin fails to bring lasting satisfaction. Sin has lots of effects. It harms us and besets us. We should do everything we can to avoid it.


Watch the Video Version of this Post

"Can I Ask That?" Mini-Video Series Introduction

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Can I Ask That? Series

“Can I Ask That?”

Recently I was posed a handful of questions by a current Saddleback Pastor, Brandon Bathauer of Saddleback Church’s Irvine South and Great Park Campuses. He asked if I could give a one-minute response on 7 different questions about faith.
Here are the 7 questions in this series:
1. Is It OK to Ask Hard Questions About Faith?
2. Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People?
3. Is God Republican or Democrat?
4. Why Do Christians Believe in Such an Old Book?
5. What Does God Say About Sexuality and Identity?
6. Is God Really Violent?
7. Is Jesus Really the Only Way?

Follow Along Each Week for Another Installment of This 7 Part Video Series!


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Click to Learn More About Joining a Live Study by Pastor Brandon Bathauer on Wednesdays, 6:30pm PST from April 26-June 7, 2017 at Saddleback Church (Irvine South Campus) 18842 Teller Avenue, Irvine, Calif

What Does It Mean To Become a Christian?

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What does it mean to be a Christian
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What Does It Mean to Become a Christian?

      The Christian life, and Christianity is general, is largely misunderstood in American and perhaps other cultures. There are many reasons, I’m sure, but I’m certain that part of it is because of caricatures assigned to it by non-adherents, and it is also due to the failure of many who profess Christ to articulate their faith with clarity AND TO LIVE their faith with integrity.

So I’m ask the question… What is the Christian life?

I am a Christian. That means I believe in Jesus Christ.

I follow Christ. I am wrapping my life and existence around the teachings of Jesus.

The Christian life is first and foremost about individual people who, in the warp and woof of life, have walked down the winnowing path of human existence and—through any number of experiences and events—come to a point in their thinking, where they realized that all was not well.

It happens in so many ways.  This realization leads a person to a point where they feel drawn to God in an increasingly tangible way, and become more and more open to the possibility and—ultimately, the reality, that Jesus Christ is a living reality—an existential BEING who is capable of and interested in cultivating a relationship with each of us, and specifically ME—or, YOU, as the case may be.
And at some point, that person acknowledges the reality of God, and the truth of Christ, and commits his or her life to Jesus by surrendering to His authority.

This type of belief is sometimes called “saving faith.”It is called “Salvation” by Christians, because one is QUOTE, saved, from himself—saved from the ramifications of his or her decisions and actions that wounded their relationship to God and that violated God’s authority.

This belief is associated with a recognition of the fact that things in our lives didn’t go the way they ought to have gone—that we failed to be all we were created to be—that we often violated our consciences to recklessly pursue desires and directions that were fundamentally and diametrically opposed to that which is good. And this pursuit of vice ended up causing us to violate others, ourselves and most importantly, the God who created us in His image. And for that reason, because we have an obligation to him as our Maker—just as a child might be obligated to recognize the authority of his parent or parents, we must answer to Him for our disobedience and our loss or, perhaps better, the forfeiture of virtue.

This acknowledgment is essentially the recognition that, though we are persons of value, we are nonetheless soiled— that is, we are contaminated… and that the contamination we suffer and bear is the outcome of our own doing. We must recognize that, left unattended, that corruption will ultimately result in our undoing.

So a person in this condition calls out to God, silently or audibly—it matters not, and in the sanctuary of their hearts, their innermost beings, they admit to God that they are estranged from a right and harmonious and peaceful relationship with him—and that the reason for this is our own personal rebellion— something that could and should be rightly called “sin” meaning, disobedience toward God.

This disobedience was against God and we know that is the case because we understand and FEEL guilty and culpable for violating our conscience and, wittingly or unwittingly, have also violated the standards God articulated in his love letter to humanity—which is what the Holy Bible actually is.

So the Holy Bible provides us with the written standard of what God desires and expects, and what is required for us to live in harmony with him… and, incidentally, with others.

So the attitude of a person wanting to repair his relationship with God confesses this reality of sin and the resultant loss of inner peace and asks God to forgive him or her. What this means is that, such a person feels sorrow, contrition, regret, disappointment and even guilt for past thoughts, attitudes, and actions, and then ASKS FOR and receives forgiveness from God.. and this then INITIATES a relationship with God through the person of Jesus Christ. And such a person considers Jesus his only hope for abundant living now and eternal life now and later.

And what that means is that a person who desires to be reconciled with God and to patch up his or her relationship with God and to enter into a real and actual relationship with the God of the Universe invites the one and only Son of God, Jesus Christ into his life and then begins a new life—ONE that seeks to cultivate a relationship with God.

That is what it means to become a Christian—being reconciled to God by Faith Alone through Christ Alone.

Your Next Step

Let us know if you have made a commitment to follow Christ.  Also, get other helpful content by staying informed with DigitalDiscipler and Podcast Seminary on Soapbox Network!

 

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The Green-Eyed Monster: How to Get Rid of Envy and Entitlement

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Green eyed Monster
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Envy. Entitlement. Those are two words I hate.
That isn’t to say I haven’t ever practiced those vices. But I really do hate them.
Envy is, of course, inward turmoil stimulated by a heart that cannot celebrate another’s good fortune. It involves wanting what another has. Jealousy, envy’s evil twin and hellacious handmaiden, involves personal resentment toward the one in question. Whereas an envious person wants what another has, jealousy [at least] simply doesn’t want the other person to have it.
Clearly, both usually go together: The envious person sometimes, if not usually, becomes jealous. The results of envy-jealousy includes the dropping of one’s countenance toward the fortunate (or blessed) person, then self-justifying (and sometimes-irrational) frustration which often deteriorates into further ungodly manifestations.
Self contamination
If I can take a bunny trail here— let me share a word about those ungodly manifestations. It seems to me that jealousy-envy often contaminates and/or wounds both the perpetrator and its victim(s). What I mean is that, once envy erodes into jealousy, it is not unusual for the jealous person to be contaminated by seething anger, internal rage, and finally contempt. Sometimes these emotions are accompanied by abuse and violence– verbal, physical, or both. As a result, the jealous person often ends up suffering a sense of guilt, personal condemnation, self-loathing, and, at worse, despair.
And if that were not enough, the victim of jealous envy also suffers, wittingly or not.
But this post is not only about envy; it’s also about entitlement. But I mentioned both because envy is often accompanied by entitlement. But entitlement can also be an “independent vice.” So entitlement doesn’t require the presence of envy though, like women who go to public restrooms in groups, they often appear together.
So, what of “entitlement?”
Entitlement is a perspective… a mentality. It usually manifests itself as an assumption that one DESERVES something– an expectation of a perceived (or moral) right. Now keep in mind that there ARE legitimate entitlements. But those are not my concern, nor are they the topic of this post. Rather, I am concerned about the general and pervasive “entitlement mentality” that hangs like a dark cloud over many people, including certain sections of the American populous. And just as “groups” of people develop entitlement mentalities, individuals do it as well. Those who do so consider it an outrage that they sometimes must “do without” or otherwise should actually “do something”– rather than doing nothing but having an expectation of receiving something nevertheless.
All this serves as a long introduction to the central idea of this post: The Elimination of Envy and Entitlement.
In the past, I assumed several things… Things like:

  1. BLESSINGS SPOIL PEOPLE
  2. MATERIAL NICETIES STIMULATE THE BASE INSTINCTS OF OUR HUMANITY AND DRIVE ENVY INTO PEOPLE
  3. THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN GIVEN MUCH ALWAYS DEVELOP AN ENTITLEMENT MENTALITY THAT SPOILS THEM, AND FINALLY…
  4. BLESSINGS PRODUCE ENTITLEMENT IN THE PERSON WHO RECEIVES THEM AND ENVY IN THOSE WHO DO NOT.

 
But I no longer think those things.
Oh, sure, we’ve SEEN EXAMPLES of those ideas– but I have come to believe that no cause-effect relationship exists between blessing and entitlement or envy.
 I remember when my elder son, Dakota, turned 11. For his birthday he got this insanely great gift that virtually no child his age has. To boot, Dakota enjoys a life foreign to my own early years. He (and his brother Christian) is, in many ways, a child of plenty. He has never known “need.” He would hardly even understand the concept of “want.” And yet, the enormous blessings he enjoys are (a) not “expected” by him, nor (b) have these opportunities and experiences soiled or spoiled him. Dakota is genuinely thankful and grateful. And though all the results aren’t in– his life and demeanor has shown me that envy, entitlement, and blessing CAN BE mutually exclusive.
So what makes the difference?
I believe that envy and entitlement are eliminated from blessed people when those people possess character.
Character (or its absence) is, I believe, the single arbiter of envy and entitlement mentalities. With character, those bad character qualities are not present. Without character, those vices breed, mutate, and multiply.
So now, instead of withholding “good” from my child/children, I feel the freedom to bless them liberally. And rather than spending all my energies regretting my generosity and battling their growing envy and entitlement, I work on ensuring that they are developing character. I think that’s the way God intended it to be, and it helps me enjoy being a generous father– just as my Heavenly Father is.

Your Next Step

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Biology PHD: Where Will It Take You?

The great danger of seeking advanced degrees is not planning for one’s academic career options far enough in advance, prior to graduation.
Of the 16,000 Biology Ph.D. students entering programs each year, over 1/3 will not complete.  The average Biology Ph.D. requires 7 years to complete.
Of those who do graduate, 7/10 will enter a post-doc program. Sadly, over 30% of all graduates will be forced to do two or more post-doc programs, all because of the lack of academic positions available.

Study by Jessica Polka
Study by Jessica Polka

There are positions available, but the market is tight and requires savvy approaches to help graduates gain a strategic position search advantage. Earning a degree and assuming one will beat the odds just isn’t realistic.
The best advice?
Invest in your education and career at the same time.  Don’t wait until you complete your program.
 
 
Sources:
Original Article by Jessica Polka on ASCB.org
1 – Science Careers Annual Postdoc Survey (2012)
2 – doi:10.1038/472276a
3 – Sauermann & Roach 2012 PLOS ONE; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036307
Unless otherwise noted, NIH Biomedical Workforce Working Group (2012).